Research and Development L6: Statement of Intent

Value, Functionality and Invisible Gardens

During my time in Sweden, being away from home led me to work with the themes of place and placelessness. I also found myself building on concepts about memory and space from the Port Eynon field module I did months before in which we worked with ideas of mythical and imaginary landscapes. For our ‘room and space’ module I worked in particular with the idea of ‘non-place’ as defined by French anthropologist ‘Marc Auge and became particularly interested in the spaces of transience in cities. Following tags such as ‘non-place’ and ‘imaginary cities’ on Instagram I stumbled across artist Sapphire Goss’s Eternity City project for Milton Keynes. The project developed over the summer of 2018 and culminated in September with a series of film installations projected onto the city’s architecture, showing plants from the ‘edgelands’ of the city as they decayed.

Inspired by this project and the work of ceramic artists using natural materials sourced from the landscape (in particular Adam Buick and Matthew Blakely) I want to work with the urban surroundings in Cardiff. I am interested in the city’s natural gardens such as roadside verges and overgrown areas of weeds beside parks and along the Taff trail. These spaces are deemed ugly and overgrown but through an in depth technical exploration of these overlooked, undesirable plants, I hope to emphasise the potential beauty in the overlooked. Having a father who is a botanist means I have grown up hearing about invasive species such as rhododendron and Japanese knotweed at the dinner table but also about the necessity for protecting rare species under SSSIs. Studying English literature at college I became familiar with the nature vs man opposition in literature (Andrew Marvell’s ‘The Mower Against Gardens’ pops to mind as does John Wyndham’s Day of the Triffids and the musical Little Shop of Horrors.) I intend to root my work over the next three months in this ecological urban context.

While the overriding context of the work may be broad and drawing from many different sources, I intend to approach this project practically as a product designer. My focus for the next few months will be throwing a collection of functional tableware and improving my skills on the wheel through disciplined practice. My aim is to create a series of products with similar design characteristics in form and unified by the glazes sourced from these urban edgelands. I intend to have a mixture of traditional and non-traditional pots in this group of products. Traditional functional objects such as those discussed in Bernard Leach’s ‘A Potter’s Book’ and Michael Cardew’s ‘Pioneer Pottery’ will feature (such as storage jars and mugs) but I am also interested in making series of thrown utensils which are not so common. Ceramic cocktail shakers, butter, casserole dishes and other pots which are made up of more than one part are of particular interest to me. Since these items all have moving parts they continue with my interest in the first year of participatory ceramics and are objects which need to be touched and moved to be understood.

I hope by the end of these three months to have a large body of work with series of near-identical products and to have developed a range of around four stoneware reduction glazes which will then be used to decorate the body of work. I hope the work questions relationships between humans and our urban and natural landscapes. I like the idea of juxtaposing desirable, neat, functional objects with these city spaces we consider worthless, messy and unfunctional.

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Colour Compositions

After a conversation with Alice about Italian Still life painter Giorgio Morandi, I went searching for sheets of coloured card on which to experiment with photographing my series of sculptures from the ‘non-spaces’ project.  It’s fascinating to see how much the glare from the coloured card effects the objects. The dark blue which is my favourite gives a kind of softness and warmth to the glazes. The yellow is too sharp and harsh while the grey and light blue make everything look washed out.

It’s fun to take the shapes, forms and colours out of the context of the original project. Instead I’m simply working with their material properties in a kind of collage. This method has a lot in common with the work I saw recently at the Moderna Museet in Stockholm about ‘Concretism’. Concrete art ”accustoms man to a direct relationship with things and not with the fiction of things” by rejecting the creation of the illusion of space and three dimension on canvas. Similarly, I don’t want to create an illusion her. I am not interested in conveying any deep meaningful message, I’m only concerned with the balance of form, colour and of positive and negative space.

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In other news, I’ve started constructing larger sculptures using repeated press moulded sections in a white molochite stoneware. I’m really excited by the possibilities of working in this way. I like the control over the overall shape from the press mould. It restricts the decisions I can make so I only have to decide where to place them. This new clay is great to work with too – it dries quickly , supporting itself, and so far none of the joins have cracked. I want to see if it’s possible for the shapes to interlock and interact once they have been fired to form one larger piece.

 

https://www.modernamuseet.se/stockholm/en/exhibitions/concrete-matters/

 

L5 Final Project Proposal: Hierarchy of Space

Title: The Fantastical Non-Space: Subverting the hierarchy of place

Aim: I want to redefine the way people interact with what might be called the ‘ubiquitous urban landscape’ and more specifically non-places in this environment – spaces that have no identity, diversity or surprise. I am equally interested in the holiness we give to religious sites and places of worship and want to explore how weaving a narrative around the mundane spaces we pass through every day can elevate them to a space of significance.

Why: I want to play with the dichotomy between non-space and the anthropological space by giving unimportant no-places an identity, sense of humour and aspect of diversity and surprise – all the things they lack. In ‘The Spell of the Sensuous’ , David Abram uses the example of the clay bowl to illustrate the magic of the everyday : ‘its very existence as a bowl ensures that there are dimensions wholly inaccessible to me – most obviously the patterns hidden between its glazed and unglazed surfaces, the interior density of its clay body’. What we perceive as reality is only a skin of the true essence of our environment. I want people going about their daily routines to get back that sense of wonder you feel at the world when you are a child. I want to give people time to stop and daydream, to think about the spaces we inhabit day-to day and the role of fantasy in our lives.

Background: I first came across the concept of non-places while researching for the room/space project and consequently began working with the non-space of tram interiors to try and highlight the beauty in the everyday, mundane and invisible man-made environments that surround us. I want to develop this further and make work that sits in these environments.

I have also recently been reading about the Slow Movement – specifically Slow food but also about Slow Cities and am interested in how these ideas around slowing down our pace of living so that we have more meaningful encounters with the world around us can be applied to my field of art and design. I will look at examples of art in the public space – graffiti, yarn bombing, guerrilla advertising etc. artworks that draw our attention to the environment.

Method: I plan to create a series of site specific works around the city of Gothenburg, turning non-spaces into spaces of significance or interest. One method would be to create ‘relics for a non-place’ by spinning a made up/fantasy narrative about a space, turning these sites into fictional places of pilgrimage. I am interested in using augmented reality through QR codes or apps such as Augment and Aurasma alongside the sculptures to communicate the made up stories/legends associated with a certain place. I am not sure yet if the work will take the form of a series of photographs.

I intend to use writing as a ‘material’ as well as method for generating ideas for what my work should be about. I have never used this approach before but I would like to try and respond to a space by writing poetry/fiction and then working from that. I want to spin fictional narratives around spaces. I feel inspired after seeing a piece by artist Remy Dean about a fictional letter found in an attic. How important is truth in art if the story is good? I have also been thinking about the work of Jospeh Beuys – Beuys frequently blurred the lines between art and life, and fact and fiction, by suggesting that what one believed to constitute “reality” mattered more in matters of human action, social/political behaviour, and personal creativity than any definition of everyday reality based on traditional standards of “normalcy,” or social codes of so-called “proper” conduct.
http://www.theartstory.org/artist-beuys-joseph.htm

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Joseph Beuys, Sled, 1969
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Beddgelert – The legend of Gelert the Dog
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Mythical Locations on road signs in Didcot, Oxfordshire (once labelled England’s ‘most normal town’)

Keywords: fiction, non-space, unexpected, joy, magic, holy, narrative, relic, religious art, altars, pilgrimage site, humour, truth…

Primary research choosing sites to work with – Borrow a camera and respond through photography, sketching, and writing.
Examples of non-spaces/low spaces : Underpasses (Banehagsgatan)..Concrete
Industrial area tram stops (Gamlestadstorget)
Car Parks (Nordstan)
Centralstation

Also visit and respond to places of worship in the city – Masthuggskyrkan, Oscar Fredriks Church…

Thoughts that arose in the feedback session: 

  • How do I define what I consider a non-space, which writers influence my POV? Can natural spaces also be considered non-spaces? Consider different people’s perspectives of spaces, non-spaces might not be invisible/insignificant to everyone.
  • Do I have a political motivation for the project, what does it communicate about urbanisation and gentrification?
  • Will people stumble upon the artworks or will I create a guided tour/app for people to discover them?
  • Will my stories be entirely fiction or should I research the history of Gothenburg to base some of the information on facts?
  • Will I work with one site or multiple?

Image sources:
http://www.artnews.com/2015/03/20/academic-artist-scholar-shaman-joseph-beuys-on-his-mystical-objects-in-1970/
http://www.notey.com/blogs/road-signs
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PMll6yQaH1A

 

‘Stannar Vid’ – Non-Spaces Final Exhibition

 

On Thursday we culminated the Room/Space project with an exhibition of the work we have produced over the last month. My playful and brightly coloured body of work explores the concept of non-spaces and is an attempt to draw attention to the transitional invisible spaces we pass through every day without being aware of them. In order to highlight this my work was presented in alcoves in the arch spaces of the walls in the HDK’s stairwells, spaces we don’t often linger in but which become complex and beautiful architectural spaces once you start to look carefully.

A collection of 14 hand-built sculptures sit inside four shelf spaces of varying height along the staircases, the steps offering the opportunity to view them from many different angles. During feedback it was pointed out that these forms look like little figures interacting with each other, each with a different personality. The space between each of them gives them a sense of isolation though, which communicates the anonymity and isolation of individuals as they interact in non-spaces. Students pointed out that the forms were familiar and look significant in some way, although they weren’t sure where they recognised them from. Perhaps a well-chosen title could be a key to understanding the pieces. Maybe something like ‘Stannar vid‘, which is the automated voice announcement on Gothenburg trams to tell you your next stop. It suggests the way the staircase is a space for ‘getting to’ somewhere else, not a place just ‘to be’.

 

The colours turned out much patchier than I intended but this nod towards rust and weathering also suggests the wear and tear caused by many people passing through a space day in, day out. I need to work on my glaze application, dipping and spraying would have created a more even surface colour than painting on. I’ve learnt the important of thinking ahead to decoration in the making stage too – the manganese in this dark clay has eaten away at the glaze. The red glaze turned out much pinker than I intended – with more time I would have perfected the colour matches by making more glaze tests.

 

Klara mentioned how she began noticing scratches and paint splatters on the wall which echoed the forms of the sculptures and other students mentioned the key word ‘curiosity’. I believe this display of work has been successful in changing he way we interact with this non-space but equally, by using forms inspired by tram interiors people explained how not only was this space transformed but that when they travelled home on the trams they would be looking out for these forms and textures by searching the other way around. Two spaces transformed in one!

Thanks Will Treasure for some of the photos 🙂

Room/Space Project Development

20180312_151307 (600x800)With two weeks left to go of the Room project I think it’s time for reflection on how the project has developed so far and how I intend to bring my exploration of ideas to culminate in a final installation.

I chose the HDK’s black grogged stoneware clay to begin making with, the graininess makes it ideal to hand build with because it keeps its form well. At first I worked quite strictly from the collages I made from the earlier tram drawings but discovered quickly that this ‘steampunk’ aesthetic wasn’t what I wanted. I don’t like the way the clay is manipulated to look like metal or rivets, instead of celebrating the qualities of this material I am hiding it. I realise that since this bothers me perhaps the tenet of ‘truth to material’ is somewhat important in my work.

After a tutorial and discussing with others I decided to focus on simplified forms instead of details. I still preferred my collages to the clay models, so this week I took the approach of collaging clay to create more two-dimensional ‘illustrations’ of my illustrations. These were made by rolling thin slabs and assembling them roughly and quickly together when in a leather hard state. The rough edges and unfinished, breaking apart look is an attempt to capture the fuzziness of how the memory of a place appears in our mind.

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In a group tutorial today a few people commented on the fresh and spontaneous way these objects feel because they have been constructed quickly and fairly sloppily. Although I would like to see the sculptures on a bigger scale it would be hard to get the same effect of haziness and sketchiness.  20180321_131528 (800x400)Looking for a semi-matte base glaze with which to experiment I found this simple recipe online at https://ceramicartsnetwork.org/daily/ceramic-glaze-recipes/low-fire-glaze-recipes/easy-peasy-cone-04-glaze-recipes/

Satin Base Glaze Cone 4 (1168C)
Frit                  50                    (used Borax)
Kaolin             20
Dolomite        30

I added 10% coloured stains in different proportions of colour to this to try and match the colours found in tram interiors in Gothenburg. The orange, yellow and light blue are prefect although the pink was supposed to be red and the blue is too purple. Unfortunately on the black stoneware these glazes bubble but I still intend to use these glazes to decorate my original ‘sketches’ in clay – the haziness of the colour might work to reflect the blurriness of memory and the patchiness might reference the dirtiness of the trams.

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Over the next two weeks I’m going to continue working with this collage technique but in a white low firing clay, hopeful the juxtaposition of these ‘sketched’ sculptures and a smooth, uniform and neatly coloured glaze will create impact. I’m going to try working on a slightly bigger scale so that there is some different in height levels in the final staircase exhibition. I have tried placing some objects on the stairs already to see how they look in this different context but the dark colour of the clay means they are lost against the surroundings. I hope the bright colours will change this and create a sense of playfulness and intrigue. I also plan to create more accurate blue and red glazes, a grey and a lemon yellow. 

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A Gothenburg tram interior : http://www.simplonpc.co.uk/T_Gothenburg.html

Non-Space and Tram Sketching

For our current ‘Space/Room’ project I’m interested in exploring the phenomenon of ‘non-places’ or ‘non-spaces’. I can’t remember where I first heard about this, but I recall thinking about it after reading Italo Calvino’s ‘Invisible Cities’ and remember thinking when flying from the UK to Gothenburg, how airports are the ultimate ‘non-places’ spaces we move through to get to somewhere else instead of destinations in themselves.

According to Wikipedia: Non-place or nonplace is a neologism coined by the French anthropologist Marc Augé to refer to anthropological spaces of transience where the human beings remain anonymous and that do not hold enough significance to be regarded as “places”. Examples of non-places would be motorways, hotel rooms, airports and shopping malls. The term was introduced by Marc Augé in his work Non-Places, introduction to an Anthropology of Supermodernity.

The non-place differs from the idea of an ‘anthropological space’- a space where people can share a space that empowers their identity, in that non-places are filled with strangers who remain anonymous and lonely. Non-places can also be subjective though – to a group of friends who choose to spend the day together at a shopping centre and the people who work at an airport, the spaces might not be considered non-places. The idea of transience in relation to ceramics interests me because ceramic material is the opposite of transient in its solidity and durability.

My starting point for this project was to visit and document Gothenburg’s Centralstation – recording sounds, photographing and noting down shapes and words in response to the space. Reading Marc Auge’s chapter about ‘non-spaces’ and Mahyar Arefi’s article ‘Non-place and placelessness as narratives of loss’ helped define more concretely what non-spaces are. These places lack diversity, surprise, ambiguity and livability, we are often fed through these spaces in a system by following a set of instructions, signs or arrows.

Travelling back to the university from the train station I felt lost and unsure of how to continue. I hadn’t felt particularly inspired by this place. Drawing my attention back to the present though I realised I was travelling in another ‘non-space’, the inside of a tram. When travelling on trams as I do every day here in Gothenburg my thoughts are so often elsewhere that had I not payed attention, I probably couldn’t tell you what colour the floor, walls or seats were. I decided to shift my project to highlight the material qualities of the interior of trams in the city, making objects that echo and paraphrase the forms, colours and textures of these spaces which usually remain invisible to those inside them. My intention is to display the work in a different non-space – the stairwells at HDK. I move through these static spaces almost every day of the week. In contrast I remain still in the tram and it’s the space itself that moves with me inside it.

I spent this afternoon travelling on trams sketching the forms and textures I could find around me. Once I began looking I realised how complex and mysterious these spaces are. There are so many buttons and levers, hidden compartments and strange shaped protrusions that suddenly these spaces that seem very mundane and unexciting became landscapes of shapes. Later I photocopied and enlarged my drawings, cut them out and collaged them together into abstract machine compositions reminiscent of ‘robot wars’ creations. The next step is going to be to transform these ideas into 3D. I might use paper maquettes to get a sense of the scale needed for the staircase before starting to work in clay…

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