L5 Final Project Proposal: Hierarchy of Space

Title: The Fantastical Non-Space: Subverting the hierarchy of place

Aim: I want to redefine the way people interact with what might be called the ‘ubiquitous urban landscape’ and more specifically non-places in this environment – spaces that have no identity, diversity or surprise. I am equally interested in the holiness we give to religious sites and places of worship and want to explore how weaving a narrative around the mundane spaces we pass through every day can elevate them to a space of significance.

Why: I want to play with the dichotomy between non-space and the anthropological space by giving unimportant no-places an identity, sense of humour and aspect of diversity and surprise – all the things they lack. In ‘The Spell of the Sensuous’ , David Abram uses the example of the clay bowl to illustrate the magic of the everyday : ‘its very existence as a bowl ensures that there are dimensions wholly inaccessible to me – most obviously the patterns hidden between its glazed and unglazed surfaces, the interior density of its clay body’. What we perceive as reality is only a skin of the true essence of our environment. I want people going about their daily routines to get back that sense of wonder you feel at the world when you are a child. I want to give people time to stop and daydream, to think about the spaces we inhabit day-to day and the role of fantasy in our lives.

Background: I first came across the concept of non-places while researching for the room/space project and consequently began working with the non-space of tram interiors to try and highlight the beauty in the everyday, mundane and invisible man-made environments that surround us. I want to develop this further and make work that sits in these environments.

I have also recently been reading about the Slow Movement – specifically Slow food but also about Slow Cities and am interested in how these ideas around slowing down our pace of living so that we have more meaningful encounters with the world around us can be applied to my field of art and design. I will look at examples of art in the public space – graffiti, yarn bombing, guerrilla advertising etc. artworks that draw our attention to the environment.

Method: I plan to create a series of site specific works around the city of Gothenburg, turning non-spaces into spaces of significance or interest. One method would be to create ‘relics for a non-place’ by spinning a made up/fantasy narrative about a space, turning these sites into fictional places of pilgrimage. I am interested in using augmented reality through QR codes or apps such as Augment and Aurasma alongside the sculptures to communicate the made up stories/legends associated with a certain place. I am not sure yet if the work will take the form of a series of photographs.

I intend to use writing as a ‘material’ as well as method for generating ideas for what my work should be about. I have never used this approach before but I would like to try and respond to a space by writing poetry/fiction and then working from that. I want to spin fictional narratives around spaces. I feel inspired after seeing a piece by artist Remy Dean about a fictional letter found in an attic. How important is truth in art if the story is good? I have also been thinking about the work of Jospeh Beuys – Beuys frequently blurred the lines between art and life, and fact and fiction, by suggesting that what one believed to constitute “reality” mattered more in matters of human action, social/political behaviour, and personal creativity than any definition of everyday reality based on traditional standards of “normalcy,” or social codes of so-called “proper” conduct.
http://www.theartstory.org/artist-beuys-joseph.htm

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Joseph Beuys, Sled, 1969
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Beddgelert – The legend of Gelert the Dog
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Mythical Locations on road signs in Didcot, Oxfordshire (once labelled England’s ‘most normal town’)

Keywords: fiction, non-space, unexpected, joy, magic, holy, narrative, relic, religious art, altars, pilgrimage site, humour, truth…

Primary research choosing sites to work with – Borrow a camera and respond through photography, sketching, and writing.
Examples of non-spaces/low spaces : Underpasses (Banehagsgatan)..Concrete
Industrial area tram stops (Gamlestadstorget)
Car Parks (Nordstan)
Centralstation

Also visit and respond to places of worship in the city – Masthuggskyrkan, Oscar Fredriks Church…

Thoughts that arose in the feedback session: 

  • How do I define what I consider a non-space, which writers influence my POV? Can natural spaces also be considered non-spaces? Consider different people’s perspectives of spaces, non-spaces might not be invisible/insignificant to everyone.
  • Do I have a political motivation for the project, what does it communicate about urbanisation and gentrification?
  • Will people stumble upon the artworks or will I create a guided tour/app for people to discover them?
  • Will my stories be entirely fiction or should I research the history of Gothenburg to base some of the information on facts?
  • Will I work with one site or multiple?

Image sources:
http://www.artnews.com/2015/03/20/academic-artist-scholar-shaman-joseph-beuys-on-his-mystical-objects-in-1970/
http://www.notey.com/blogs/road-signs
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PMll6yQaH1A

 

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Performance Art Workshop

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Performance piece with group participation

Last week we were set the task of working in pairs with students from the textiles and jewellery departments to create a performance artwork which in some way explored space and the room. On Thursday afternoon we got together to watch each other’s performances. I’m familiar with the work of artists such as Yoko Ono and Maria Abramovic, but this was my first experience of creating my own performance. It turned out to be a lot of fun and yielded some interesting results about how people behave when placed in different situations as a group or individuals.

In the first performance we saw one person trying to catch avocado stones the other was throwing at her inside a heavy ceramic cylinder to 80s disco music. The high energy performance felt like watching an sporting competition. In another performance the three artists each wrote consecutive letters in their turn with black ink on a sheet of paper stuck to the wall. After they’d made their mark the paintbrush was handed to a member of the audience and we were invited to carry on the message. It was an interesting exploration in setting rules – the artists had set rules that they only painted one letter but some of the audience instead drew lines and symbols, some kept to the ‘rules’ that had been set. One of the students splashed the paint onto the paper so it got on the wall and ran down to the floor, out of the set ‘boundaries’ of the paper. One we’d all had a go drawing something the paintbrush carried on for a bit until someone decided for the group that the artwork was finished and placed the paint down on the floor. The result of the final piece was unpredictable. We as the audience had to set our own end point. It’s an interesting exploration of language too, there was a mixture in the class of first languages so perhaps we all expected words to be formed in languages familiar to us.

In one performance three of the students moved around into different positions, engaging each with a different object: an ironing board, a bin bag of clay and a chair. They held each improvised ‘still life’ frame for about six seconds before moving again, carrying forward the linear narrative until the time was up. Another performance involved the two students ‘in power’ placing the rest of us around the room as if we were inanimate objects. It felt like being a mannequin in a shop window.

A couple of the girls invited us to sit inside a circle of thread in silence where they attempted to make eye contact with each of us in turn. The final performance involved two of the students hiding in a corner of the room behind some boxes each working with the material most familiar to them – clay and wood in this case. They didn’t announce the performance had started so you had to find your way to their small room where they created a intimate space of stillness and contemplation, a safe space for themselves into which we felt we couldn’t intrude.

I worked alongside Sanne, a student from the jewellery department to create a performance which involved us creating an enclosure similar to a sheep pen with a couple of tables and leading the audience one by one into this tightly enclosed space. We kept some ‘chosen’ people on the side and after we’d closed in the ‘pen’ with chairs, we got out a line of chairs facing it and invited the ‘chosen ones’ to sit with us, eat popcorn and watch the people who were trapped in the enclosure before us. The whole performance took place with the Star Wars theme tune playing in the background.
Our idea was to turn our fear of performing in front of the others upside down, by structuring ourselves as the viewers and them as the ones being watched. We hoped the fizzy drinks and popcorn would create the feeling of being in a cinema, but I also compared the performance to the human zoos I learnt about at the current ‘Diorama’ exhibition by Annika Dahlsten and Markku Laakso at the Röda Sten Konsthall.

In feedback about the artwork we learnt that those who were led into the small table room initially felt like they were the chosen, privileged ones, that they were going aboard a space ship (the star wars tune create this illusion), but after the next stage of the performance took place they realised they weren’t going anywhere and didn’t get any popcorn. This quickly ignited a revolution led by one of the students who stepped over the boundary we had created between us and followed by other students the popcorn and drinks were quickly shared between everyone. Those in the power seats felt bad for the others and began to give out popcorn too, but it took a few minutes before people felt comfortable stepping out of the roles the game had created for them.

It was interesting that so many of the performances involved the rest of the audience. Perhaps when you have a fear of performing, including everyone else is a means of feeling less exposed?

Art in Clay Hatfield

Just back from a magical few days volunteering (for the first time) at the 23rd Art in Clay on the grounds of Hatfield House. This was a great opportunity to meet makers of all sorts of styles and techniques and learn more about their work, while at the same time learning how to display work for sale and interact with the public. Saturday night’s BBQ was a highlight and it was great to meet like-minded ceramics students from Farnham. Definitely one for next year’s calendar!

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Another of the show’s highlights for me was Matthew Blakely’s talk about sourcing the rocks and materials he uses for his glazes. Seeing the vibrant range of effects he could get with as little as wood ash and clay has inspired me to start sourcing my own glaze materials from places I travel as well as my local area. He described how he uses a ball mill to grind down materials and how some rocks (like granite) will become soft when heated in a kiln while flint is dangerous because it will explode. He also spoke of the importance of getting permission to gather materials from the landscape, especially when selling the work afterwards, and of taking photos of where the natural rocks, clays and ashes were sourced. I agree with the audience members it would be great to see the finished pots photographed in the landscape they are linked to, like Adam Buick does. Matthew explained how buyers would receive a CD with their pot with information about how it was made.
It was insightful to see how different potters wrapped theirs work too, some using bubble wrap, newspaper, brown paper and elastic bands…some having to use round boxes with lots of sponge for fragile work.

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Melissa Pritchard runs Parade Mews pottery in South London and creates stunning soda fired pots. Some of the glazes shimmer like fish scales.

 

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Kathrin Najorka’s wood and salt-fired stoneware (above) is modest and homely, effectively displayed on these dark wooden shelves to make them look even more rustic. I really admired her work as well as the porcelain and stoneware thrown tableware of another German artist – Susanne Lukas-Ringel. I’d like to learn more about firing in these alternative ways to an electric kiln.

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As I mentioned in a previous post I find myself drawn to works made in a black clay body with surface decoration in white. Naturally, I got really excited when I saw Margaret Curtis‘s work! She began using black clay after visiting the studio of Japanese potter Miwa Kyusetsu X1 and admiring the crawling snow-white shino glazes on the black clay body of his tea bowls (chawan). She achieves crusting white textures with thick porcelain slip.

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Tim Lake is a potter based in Carmarthenshire who makes eastern inspired pots, bowls and tea bowls, all on a kickwheel. I was drawn to the natural, muted colours of the glazes and impressed decoration.

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Surprisingly though, my favourite piece in the whole show was not a ‘pot’ in the traditional sense at all, but this adorable ‘little ugly being’ by Chiu-i-wu. It’s a fat little creature with sharp teeth that clearly just wants to be loved! Her work is hand-built and she draws influences from her love of English summers as well as her home country Taiwan. Her forms remind me of illustrations in children’s books and this dry, green surface makes me think of the oxidation you get on copper roofs.

Sandals on Stow Hill

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With the Chartism ‘In their footsteps’ launch event planned for this Friday morning, I took the train to Newport yesterday to meet up with Dylan, one of the project’s organisers, to figure out the placement of my sandals for the installation.

Following the march of the Chartists down Stow Hill, a series of footprints have been etched into the pavement at intervals, with the hope that members of the public will interact with them, literally following ‘in their footsteps’. The ones here face Bethel Community Church and when standing on them, the pair of ceramic African sandals below will be visible. The Sanctuary project at the church works with international communities and offers support to asylum seekers and refugees in Newport. I spent time with an English class there earlier this year where we welcomed the men to make clay shoes for the installation at St Woolos cathedral at the top of the hill. Interestingly many of them ended up making sandals, so this pair will sit outside the sanctuary project to represent them.

The glaze turned out much patchier than expected, probably because I had to wipe the previous layer of reduction glaze off when I realised my mistake (these are oxidation fired). However, when seen from high up on the street the white stands out pretty well.

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Newport Chartism Project

Yesterday we visited the Sanctuary project at Bethel Community church in Newport which offers English classes, social events and other activities for asylum seekers and refugees in the city. The men’s class we dropped in on appeared to really engage with the story of the Newport Rising, possibly recognising that the injustices the Chartists fought against still exist in some of the countries they’ve come from. They were more than happy to contribute to the clay shoes project.

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Some of the shoes, camels and goats made at the Sanctuary

We also had the opportunity to speak to some of the residents along Stow hill. A conversation at the clock and watch repair shop which we visited to see the photo of the old Chartists wall mural, sparked an idea for a chalk outline figure (similar to those seen in crime movies) to be etched into the pavement outside, representing where the Chartists were shot and fell as they fled from the soldiers at the Westgate.
Another suggestion was from the old olive branch day centre for the homeless (which I learnt was situated where Newport public baths used to be) but has sadly just closed down – Stow hill could do with some sort of bench along its steep incline.

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Experimenting with layout for the final piece

Today we were  joined by ceramic artist Ned Haywood, the maker for the famous blue commemorative wall plaques that adorn buildings around the UK where significant people have lived. The plaques are high fired white stoneware which has the benefits of being highly durable, rust-proof and harder than steel. Ned demonstrated to the visiting school children a way of making shoes from three paper templates – a sole, front and back, similar to how a shoemaker would assemble sections of cut leather but using sheets of rolled clay instead. Details like stitches and laces were added afterwards with a variety of tools.

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Shoes make by the children to Ned’s template

I also had an opportunity to visit the Newport museum which has an in-depth section on the history of the Chartists, including a variety of weapons on display, similar to those which would have been used in the Newport conflict. It’s been exciting to learn about a significant historical event I knew nothing of before the start of the week.

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Shoe at the museum

The graph below shows how democracy grew in countries around the world between 1800- and 2000. What’s significant about this data is the way the graph line begins to climb after the 1840s- the decade in which the Chartists pushed for political reform. They appear to have sowed the seed for the roots of democracy across the globe.

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ChARTism on the hill

Almost 180 years ago, on the 4th of November 1839 around 5000 workers from the surrounding valleys descended on Newport calling for political reform. They were furious and desperate to change their terrible working conditions. Child labour was rife and a stratified society meant people were forced to work for wealthy landowners for pittance.
Headed by their leader John Frost, the men, known as Chartists marched  down the steep Stow Hill and assembled in front of the Westgate hotel. But, the protest wasn’t to flow smoothly. Violence broke out as the Chartists clashed with soldiers in the hotel and as a result it’s believed 22 of the protesters were shot and killed with many more injured. Workhouse registers from the era prove Chartists were admitted there after the incident with gunshot wounds. The incident became known as the Newport Rising. 

Chartism (named so because of ‘the people’s charter’ that was drawn up and presented to the house of commons) had began in the late 1830s and was a working class movement calling for such values as democracy, equality and dignity – things we take for granted in Britain today. Among things the Chartists campaigned for was the right for all men 21 and over to vote.  At the time only around 1 in 20 men had the right to vote. They also campaigned for annual parliament (rather than elections held every 7 years) and secret voting. In 2013 a mural commemorating the Chartists in Newport was controversially knocked down by the council to make way for the new shopping centre.

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Memorial stone outside St Woolos Cathedral

With this project I’m taking part in we hope to raise awareness in the community of the importance of the Chartists and have a permanent public artwork on display along Stow Hill as well as a temporary installation at St Woolos Cathedral on top of the hill (the final resting place of some of those shot in the conflict). The installation will take the form of thousands of tiny clay shoes made by local community groups and schoolchildren.

Today I helped run workshops for children from a local primary school at the Riverside arts centre in Newport. We began the morning with activities introducing them to what Chartism was about. As a way to demonstrate the power of people coming together to demand change we took part in some role playing activities with the children playing roles of the Charters trying to get the attention of their bosses, first individually then all together. They got the chance to take part in a ballot and understand about the importance of anonymous voting.

Next they took part in a drawing exercise  and each chose a section of the story of the Newport Rising to illustrate. Interestingly the river Usk popped up in many of the drawings. It seemed looking out over the river from upstairs in the arts centre had captured the children’s imagination.

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‘The Newport Rising’ illustrated

After this we started on making the clay shoes. We began by playing with the clay, rolling it into spirals, making squares and balls etc. to learn about what it feels like to work with. Then we made pairs of shoes by shaping tiny pinch pots. The kids had a great time and we ended up with a wonderful assortment of shoes – from working boots to high heels, slippers, trainers and even flip- flops! I expect the installation will have a similar feel to Anthony Gormley’s ‘Field’ with the repetition of the shoes, each one slightly different adding power to the final outcome.

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Tiny shoes beginning to take shape!

The shoes look touchingly innocent, especially because of their small size. Their’ raggedy’ nature reflects the poverty of the workers and their hard work. There’s also a slightly sinister reference to the Auschwitz shoe room and of course the plight of child labour. Although the Chartists eventually succeeded in turning things around in Britain it was important the children learnt that unfortunately, citizens of many countries today are still deprived of basic human rights.

In the afternoon, after this busy making session, braving the heavy rain and with united cries of ‘Join us!’ and ‘Things must change!’ Pat Drewett, an expert on the Chartists, took us on a walk up Stow hill to get a taste for what the Chartists would have experienced all those years ago. The day they walked down would have been very similar to this one – wet and cold. Pat showed us illustrations of what the town would have looked like back in the 1830s and we ended our pilgrimage inside St Woolos Cathedral which hopefully before long will be filled with tiny clay shoes!

Clay is a fantastic metaphor for the way people coming together can be a catalyst for change. In a dry, raw state with lots of water between the clay particles it is brittle and weak. However when fired the water evaporates and the clay turns to ceramic which is strong and durable. In the same way, individuals speaking out against their unfair treatment were ignored however when lots of disillusioned people got together to form the Chartist movement their voice was strong enough to change the state of the country.
Clay is also a metaphor for change in the way it a lump of wet clay can be formed, crushed and reformed endless times. If you’re not happy with something you make, you can change it. Unfortunately for the Chartists changing the way the country was run, wasn’t quite as easy as reshaping a lump of clay.