Luna (2014)

The other day I re-watched ‘ Luna’ – a mesmerising, ambiguous and totally underrated film directed by the genius Dave McKean and I realised it explores a key theme I want to respond to in my work: balance, in this case the balance between fantasy and reality. The dialogue in a scene around the dinner table exposes how unreliable our mind and memories are and suggests the reality we create is part based on fantasy. We spoke a little about this in Theo Humphrey’s professional practice session today, about how our minds jump to conclusions because we are constantly bombarded with so much data, this is the only way we can make sense of and navigate the world. 

D: I think there’s precious little connection with the real world at the moment, but I don’t think you are crediting fantasy with a proper role here. I’m not talking about ghosts and fairies, I’m talking about our fantasy lives, no, our imaginative lives.
G: You can play around with the words, but it all amounts to the same thing, lack of engagement.
C: Well I’d like to hear what you have to say.
D: Thank you, I just feel there is very little fact in our lives at the moment, very little reality. This is real, our conversation is real, but what’s going to happen in an hour or so? You will have your version of events, I will have mine, and they will both be different. There will be a chaos of memories, misinterpretations, lateral connections and they will all be a fantasy. In fact, everything that you hope for and dream about, that is all a fantasy…and the layers of associations and connections that every second your brain is making as we navigate this world, it is all just a fantasy. And yet it seems as real as the news on TV, the sound of this table, the people we love, and that’s why it’s very important to deal with this definition of fantasy in our lives…
G: What about young Freya here, where do you stand on the great fantasy versus reality debate?
D: The two are not mutually exclusive.
F: Tango. I tango.
C: You dance tango.
F: Mhm. Twice a week. And if you want to see, if you’re really interested in observing the actual balance in our lives between what you call the real world and what Dean here thinks of as our fantasy lives…then it’s poised. Perfectly, in tango.
C: I’d love to go dancing.
F: It’s much more than a dance. It’s a negotiation…between friends and enemies and lovers. It’s where you see how ridiculous we all are in our make-believe lives and our courtship routines and our sabre rattling and our pretence at being self sufficient. It’s where you see how vital life is.

 

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Mysterious objects

I had a conversation with Liam last week about how my ‘tree of pots’ sculpture reminds him of a Rick and Morty episode where a ‘How it’s made’ video is shown for a nonsense invention called a ‘plumbus’. Apparently it’s an ‘all-purpose home device’ and since everyone knows what it does there is no need to explain it. I like how the animators seem to have had free reign to have fun and come up with a silly video for a vaguely sexual looking object that wouldn’t look out of place in a Dr Seuss book.

This reminded me of an episode of British comedy series Black Books where Fran finds an unusual item delivered to her gift shop but can’t sell it because she doesn’t know what it’s for (it’s later revealed that the ‘bald furby’ is in fact a lighter). I like the idea of objects that look as if they have a purpose but you can’t quite figure out what it is or how to use them. It makes me think about the context of objects and how all the tools we create and objects we use revolve around our ‘humanness’. For example, to an alien, the purpose of a screwdriver would be mysterious because they wouldn’t know what a screw was and a series of creatures that had no feet would have a hard time figuring out what socks are for.

I also draw a connection with the work of ceramic artist Harm Van der Zeeuw whose kooky sculptures I saw over the summer at ICF and Art in clay Hatfield. His steampunk style models of machines with cogs, wheels and struts look like they could move or serve some mechanical purpose but it’s all an illusion. In response to my assessment last week, Duncan and Natasha suggested I think about camera obscuras and lenses because of the way my recent work references objects you look through to use. I’m thinking back to the pin hole camera field project last year and thinking about the different devices we look through and into (Optical instruments): cameras, binoculars, glasses, telescopes, microscopes, kaleidoscopes….

 

 

Matt Glazes on Porcelain

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These are the same variations on a dolomite matt glaze as in the last glaze post. This time they’ve been fired on porcelain in oxidation 1280C. W2 (with soda feldspar) has the best white result, W1 being shinier and less brightly white while W3 has yellowish undertones. B2 is the exact kind of deep matt black I was looking for too, B1 still having a green tinge in oxidation. I’m either going to start hand building with thrown porcelain sections of covering the stoneware sculptures in porcelain slip to get these glaze results.

Peer Review Presentation

Peer Review presentation

Context – While in the city centre I came across these bollards outside the St David’s centre inviting passes by to look inside at tiny scenes of people. Artist Jane Edden created the scenes inside eleven bollards, deliberately making them black and white to contrast with the vibrancy and bustle of shopping centre: ‘I wanted them to be little moments of calm so that when people do bend down and look inside they completely enter another world.” The scenes reminded me of photos of the inside of musical instruments like violins, which look like expensive apartments because our sense of scale is distorted. Similarly I hope to play with the space inside the objects I make, drawing people in to a moment of calm.

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Context – This ‘tomb’ ceramic piece in Stoke’s Potteries museum has a hole in the top which casts a theatrical spotlight inside the form. I don’t have any details about its origins but could email the museum to learn more. The beautiful play of light reminded me of the shadows on Youngen’s work at this year’s BCB. How can my sculptures capture and play with light?

Slide2 (800x450)Context – In regards to my making methods Bryan Newman‘s composite thrown and distorted forms are a big influence. I like their playfulness and repetition of the circle motif which is loaded with symbolism.

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Skill – I’m still developing my skill of constructing with thrown forms. I’m learning that it’s best to dry these sculptures very slowly, wrapped in plastic bags to avoid cracking. I’m also aware that this process pushes me to improve my throwing because the imperfections e.g uneven walls in the vessels are revealed when they’re cut up. I’ve learnt to throw in porcelain too but have yet to gain confidence with it to start constructing composite forms. This is something I want to explore in future.

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Skill – In the past, if a glaze didn’t have the desired results, I found a new one. By learning  how to change elements in a glaze to get different effects, I feel confident altering recipes to tailor them to work for me, rather than starting from scratch each time.Slide5 (800x450)Skill – Collaborating on this project has made me consider my work in new ways. I’ve started documenting how I work with film and sound instead of simply static images. Taking time out to discuss ideas with another student rather than a tutor has been fun because some of the ideas are a bit ‘out there’ and probably not really achievable in the short space of time we have.

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Idea – In the past I haven’t thought much about how my art will be displayed as I’m making it, but I’m starting to find myself interested in art that you interact with in ways other than looking at an object on a white plinth.Slide7 (800x450)

Idea – I began by throwing random vessel forms then constructing them without a design in mind but this resulted in pieces that didn’t look balanced and were missing bits and I ended up with lots of leftover forms to reclaim. I’ve started sketching designs then working from these instead, to save time.Slide8 (800x450)

Idea – A friend, Ian Hinchliffe suggested to me the sculpture below would look great on a big scale so you could walk inside it, so I’ve decided to think about how my pieces would look scaled up or down. I want to learn how to use Photoshop to make mock-ups of these as public artwork, thinking about the work of Norwegian artist Siri Aurdal I saw in Venice.

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Katharine Pleydell-Bouverie

Dwi di ddewis ysgrifennu post yn y Gymraeg am y tro cyntaf ers i mi gychwyn yn y brifysgol dros flwyddyn yn ôl, i weld sut mae’n teimlo i newid iaith wrth siarad am fy ngwaith.
Des i ar draws casgliad o waith cerameg Katharine Pleydell-Bouverie yn yr amgueddfa ‘Potteries’ yn Stoke, a syrthio mewn cariad hefo’i gwydreddau lludw. Roedd y gwydreddau mewn arlliwiau o las, gwyrdd a llwyd yn dibynnu ar ba fath o bren oedd wedi cael ei losgi. Yn y llyfrgell ffindiais ei rysait gwydredd lludw a chymysgais hwn hefo’r lludw oedd ar gael yn adran cerameg CSAD (dwi angen gofyn o ba goeden daeth hwn) Isod mae’r gwydredd sydd wedi cael ei danio i 1280C mewn gostyngiad.
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Rysait gwydredd afloyw syml KPB:

Lludw                          40
Feldspar potash        40
China clay                  10
Ball clay                      10
(Mae ychwanegiad o 10 gwarts yn gwneud o’n llai afloyw)

Y canlyniad ydi gwydredd gwyrdd gwelw, naturiol. Fy mwriad yw casglu lludw o gyfres o brennau gwahanol a gweld sut mae’r lliw yn newid hefo bob un. Gallaf hefyd newid y feldspar i roi effaith gwahanol (mae’r post diwethaf yn profi hyn). Dwi ddim yn sicr sut i gasglu’r prennau, gallaf brynu nhw ar-lein ond bydd y prosiect yn fwy personol os gallaf gasglu’r pren fy hun.

Dwi’n gobeithio defnyddio’r gwydreddau yma i addurno’r gyfres o jygiau dwi wedi taflu mewn clai white st Thomas. Gobeithiaf dysgu mwy am danio gostyngiad oherwydd bod y lliwiau yn fwy soffistigedig ac mae’r clai yn troi’n lliw hardd mewn awyrgylch isel mewn ocsigen. Dwi di ddod o hyd i lyfr ‘Katharine Pleydell-Bouverie: a Potter’s Life 1895-1985’ yn y llyfrgell sy’n cynnwys lluniau a ryseitiau gwydreddau wedi gwneud hefo lludw cedrwydd, cnau Ffrengig, drain, rhosyn a.y.b.. i grochenwaith caled. Er bod ei gwaith hi wedi cael ei danio hefo coed tan, dwi’n gobeithio cael effeithiau tebyg hefo tanio odyn nwy.

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Matt Glazes Cone 10.R

Thinking about the surface effects I’ve identified I liked in the past I found a Mamo Matt glaze in Jeremy Jernegan’s Dry Glazes handbook and made the following variations:

Original: MC36 (W1)
Potash feldspar                     50
Dolomite                                 20
Whiting                                   4
Calcined china clay              21
Tin oxide                                 5

W2 – Replaced feldspar with 50 Soda feldspar
W3 – Replaced feldspar with 50 Nepheline Syenite
B1 – Original recipe with 1% cobalt, 8% black iron and 3% manganese
B2 – Original recipe with 4% black glaze stain

Fired in Reduction to 1280C. It was surprising to see how just changing the feldspars could change the colour so much. The potash gives a brighter, more clinical white than soda while the nepheline syenite gives blushes of pink and orange. The manganese gives a matter, more metallic black than the stain which gave more of a dark green undertone. I like the manganese black glaze (below) a lot because of the oily way it reflects the light without being too shiny. Application is better when poured.

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Below is the piece I worked on over the weekend, throwing in sections with white st Thomas then joining them together on the wheel when leather hard. Already you can see a wide ranges of tones of light and shadow and a series of ellipses when looking through the form. I enjoyed the process of making this piece and the way the pieces slotted together like a jigsaw puzzle.  The next step is to make more of these composite forms but trying to make them less symmetrical and on a smaller scale (maquette size).