L6 Characteristics of Practice

Slide1 (800x450)My favourite projects from my study time in Sweden were the anagama and wood firings. I enjoyed creating series of mugs, bowls and bottles on the wheel and discovering the different ways the flames and ashes had affected the surfaces after firing. I’ve realised from visiting exhibitions and fairs including the 2018 Hatfield Art in Clay, that I’m particularly drawn to vessel forms so I’ve decided that this form will become one of the pillars of my practice. During the vessel course in Sweden we discussed how there is something in humans which means we need to create containers for everything. We build houses to contain ourselves, then create boundaries to make countries. Our entire reality is conceived in the container of our mind through our senses and the narrow field of vision that contains what we see visually. The vessel/container is a powerful metaphor.

Slide2 (800x450)Themes of trace and memory of place have dominated my practice for a while now. I see the surface effects from the woodfiring as a continuation of this. Working on the Port Eynon Field project last year we worked with ideas of imaginary and mythical landscapes and it was interesting to see how working from the memory of a place is different to working directly with a place. Slide3 (800x450)

The Pembrokeshire coast is a place which holds a lot of memories for me. I’ve been visiting the area with my family since I was a child. Over the summer I went to visit Adam Buick’s studio and felt very drawn to his direct relationship with the environment. I liked his all embracing approach –the studio didn’t just happen to be in the environment it was part of it and what he made seemed to grow organically from the hills and the seashore. I want to return to using naturally sourced materials for my own work, for the aesthetics but also in order to make sure glazes are food safe.Slide4 (800x450)Matthew Blakely similarly uses materials collected from the environment. His focus is on rock glazes, samples of which he collects from various locations in the UK. Both potters use simple pot forms which act as a blank canvas for the random effects of crushed rocks , organic materials and ash to play on. In my own practice I’ve decided to focus on simple , functional forms, the complexity coming with the interplay of colours in the glazes on the surface.

Slide5Following on from my interest in spaces of transience in the city and ‘non-places’ and inspired by the artist Sapphire Goss’s recent interventions in Milton Keynes with a series of installations called ‘Eternity City’ I want to explore the flora particular to the urban habitat of Cardiff – the weeds and plants along the Taff trail and messy, overlooked roadside verges where we get a glimpse of what the city would look like if suddenly all people disappeared.

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At Hatfield I found I was drawn to functional ware – Ruthanne Tudball’s demonstration stood out. I like how she takes into consideration every aspect of the making including the waste product. She uses the pieces she took from the sides of the pot during faceting to decorate the knob on the lid. Her spouts and handles are made in an unusual way too – the teapot spouts are bellied out then folded over on top before being connected to the gallery rim. For the handles she first throws clay donuts before pulling them. I want to apply this same careful consideration of design to my own work. The idea of using something which is considered undesirable (in this case the waste clay) also ties in with the idea of using ash from undesirable weeds and plants in the city.

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Over the summer I borrowed a table top wheel to practice throwing. I tried making jars with galleries and flanges for the first time and really like the way these two pieces work as one, fitting snugly and satisfyingly together when you get the correct measurements. I threw the lid knobs up first then made the lid flanges hollow by trimming into them later. I want to try throwing the lids upside down so it’s easier to measure the flange against the opening of the jar. Each of the lids and jars is slightly different but I’d like to be at a stage where I can decide which design I like best and replicate it.

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Rusty oil cans and water boilers outside an antique shop in Machynlleth. Inspiration for form – I like the sharp lines and precise geometric shapes. These, like the overgrown spaces and weeds in the city I want to work with, are unwanted and uncared for.

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I’ve identified that I particularly like teapots and jars. Their lids mean that the pots become objects you feel invited to participate/play with more than you do with mugs or bowls. Something about the complexity of two or more pieces coming together to create one whole is exciting. Lidded pots call for the viewer to look inside and discover the purpose of the pot, what mystery it holds inside. Slide10 (800x450)

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