Peer Review Presentation

Peer Review presentation

Context – While in the city centre I came across these bollards outside the St David’s centre inviting passes by to look inside at tiny scenes of people. Artist Jane Edden created the scenes inside eleven bollards, deliberately making them black and white to contrast with the vibrancy and bustle of shopping centre: ‘I wanted them to be little moments of calm so that when people do bend down and look inside they completely enter another world.” The scenes reminded me of photos of the inside of musical instruments like violins, which look like expensive apartments because our sense of scale is distorted. Similarly I hope to play with the space inside the objects I make, drawing people in to a moment of calm.

Slide1 (800x450)

Context – This ‘tomb’ ceramic piece in Stoke’s Potteries museum has a hole in the top which casts a theatrical spotlight inside the form. I don’t have any details about its origins but could email the museum to learn more. The beautiful play of light reminded me of the shadows on Youngen’s work at this year’s BCB. How can my sculptures capture and play with light?

Slide2 (800x450)Context – In regards to my making methods Bryan Newman‘s composite thrown and distorted forms are a big influence. I like their playfulness and repetition of the circle motif which is loaded with symbolism.

Slide3 (800x450)

Skill – I’m still developing my skill of constructing with thrown forms. I’m learning that it’s best to dry these sculptures very slowly, wrapped in plastic bags to avoid cracking. I’m also aware that this process pushes me to improve my throwing because the imperfections e.g uneven walls in the vessels are revealed when they’re cut up. I’ve learnt to throw in porcelain too but have yet to gain confidence with it to start constructing composite forms. This is something I want to explore in future.

Slide4 (800x450)

Skill – In the past, if a glaze didn’t have the desired results, I found a new one. By learning  how to change elements in a glaze to get different effects, I feel confident altering recipes to tailor them to work for me, rather than starting from scratch each time.Slide5 (800x450)Skill – Collaborating on this project has made me consider my work in new ways. I’ve started documenting how I work with film and sound instead of simply static images. Taking time out to discuss ideas with another student rather than a tutor has been fun because some of the ideas are a bit ‘out there’ and probably not really achievable in the short space of time we have.

Slide6 (800x450)

Idea – In the past I haven’t thought much about how my art will be displayed as I’m making it, but I’m starting to find myself interested in art that you interact with in ways other than looking at an object on a white plinth.Slide7 (800x450)

Idea – I began by throwing random vessel forms then constructing them without a design in mind but this resulted in pieces that didn’t look balanced and were missing bits and I ended up with lots of leftover forms to reclaim. I’ve started sketching designs then working from these instead, to save time.Slide8 (800x450)

Idea – A friend, Ian Hinchliffe suggested to me the sculpture below would look great on a big scale so you could walk inside it, so I’ve decided to think about how my pieces would look scaled up or down. I want to learn how to use Photoshop to make mock-ups of these as public artwork, thinking about the work of Norwegian artist Siri Aurdal I saw in Venice.

Slide9 (800x450)

Advertisements

Frames and windows

20171027_160251 (517x800)

Hannah pointed out that these photos in Cardiff museum’s current exhibition ‘Swaps: Photographs from the David Hurn collection’ might be of interest to me because they explore framing and windows. The bottom one is ‘Alderney’ (2003) by Raymond Moore and the one above is by Paddy Summerfield from a series ‘Mother and father’ (1997-2007). Wandering around the museum this afternoon as part of Constellation, we were asked to consider how objects have been placed, how juxtaposition creates a new narrative, lighting etc. Visually these two photos are linked by their angular compositions, in particular the diagonal line in their top centres. The notion of looking through a frame or portal also links them, the top puts us in a position of power since the elderly couple in the garden don’t know they’re being watched. Seen in the context of the series it was originally made for it speaks of love and loss, but here it becomes sinister, almost predatory. Perhaps this in the context of all the photos documenting hate, violence and war that are in the museum collection.
‘Alderney’ has a surrealist quality because of the shock of seeing what looks like a TV screen by a country road, and yet the same bright screen would look right at home in a city centre. The only living thing in this image is the dog on the screen which is only alive in this imagined, unreal space. These ideas of looking through and into other realities are what I’m trying to explore in my current work.

Katharine Pleydell-Bouverie

Dwi di ddewis ysgrifennu post yn y Gymraeg am y tro cyntaf ers i mi gychwyn yn y brifysgol dros flwyddyn yn ôl, i weld sut mae’n teimlo i newid iaith wrth siarad am fy ngwaith.
Des i ar draws casgliad o waith cerameg Katharine Pleydell-Bouverie yn yr amgueddfa ‘Potteries’ yn Stoke, a syrthio mewn cariad hefo’i gwydreddau lludw. Roedd y gwydreddau mewn arlliwiau o las, gwyrdd a llwyd yn dibynnu ar ba fath o bren oedd wedi cael ei losgi. Yn y llyfrgell ffindiais ei rysait gwydredd lludw a chymysgais hwn hefo’r lludw oedd ar gael yn adran cerameg CSAD (dwi angen gofyn o ba goeden daeth hwn) Isod mae’r gwydredd sydd wedi cael ei danio i 1280C mewn gostyngiad.
20171025_153116 (450x800).jpg
Rysait gwydredd afloyw syml KPB:

Lludw                          40
Feldspar potash        40
China clay                  10
Ball clay                      10
(Mae ychwanegiad o 10 gwarts yn gwneud o’n llai afloyw)

Y canlyniad ydi gwydredd gwyrdd gwelw, naturiol. Fy mwriad yw casglu lludw o gyfres o brennau gwahanol a gweld sut mae’r lliw yn newid hefo bob un. Gallaf hefyd newid y feldspar i roi effaith gwahanol (mae’r post diwethaf yn profi hyn). Dwi ddim yn sicr sut i gasglu’r prennau, gallaf brynu nhw ar-lein ond bydd y prosiect yn fwy personol os gallaf gasglu’r pren fy hun.

Dwi’n gobeithio defnyddio’r gwydreddau yma i addurno’r gyfres o jygiau dwi wedi taflu mewn clai white st Thomas. Gobeithiaf dysgu mwy am danio gostyngiad oherwydd bod y lliwiau yn fwy soffistigedig ac mae’r clai yn troi’n lliw hardd mewn awyrgylch isel mewn ocsigen. Dwi di ddod o hyd i lyfr ‘Katharine Pleydell-Bouverie: a Potter’s Life 1895-1985’ yn y llyfrgell sy’n cynnwys lluniau a ryseitiau gwydreddau wedi gwneud hefo lludw cedrwydd, cnau Ffrengig, drain, rhosyn a.y.b.. i grochenwaith caled. Er bod ei gwaith hi wedi cael ei danio hefo coed tan, dwi’n gobeithio cael effeithiau tebyg hefo tanio odyn nwy.

20171025_153409 (800x445)

Matt Glazes Cone 10.R

Thinking about the surface effects I’ve identified I liked in the past I found a Mamo Matt glaze in Jeremy Jernegan’s Dry Glazes handbook and made the following variations:

Original: MC36 (W1)
Potash feldspar                     50
Dolomite                                 20
Whiting                                   4
Calcined china clay              21
Tin oxide                                 5

W2 – Replaced feldspar with 50 Soda feldspar
W3 – Replaced feldspar with 50 Nepheline Syenite
B1 – Original recipe with 1% cobalt, 8% black iron and 3% manganese
B2 – Original recipe with 4% black glaze stain

Fired in Reduction to 1280C. It was surprising to see how just changing the feldspars could change the colour so much. The potash gives a brighter, more clinical white than soda while the nepheline syenite gives blushes of pink and orange. The manganese gives a matter, more metallic black than the stain which gave more of a dark green undertone. I like the manganese black glaze (below) a lot because of the oily way it reflects the light without being too shiny. Application is better when poured.

20171023_151044 (771x800)

Below is the piece I worked on over the weekend, throwing in sections with white st Thomas then joining them together on the wheel when leather hard. Already you can see a wide ranges of tones of light and shadow and a series of ellipses when looking through the form. I enjoyed the process of making this piece and the way the pieces slotted together like a jigsaw puzzle.  The next step is to make more of these composite forms but trying to make them less symmetrical and on a smaller scale (maquette size).

 

 

Introduction to the meshwork

My study group for this year’s Constellation Level 5 is Jacqui Knight’s ‘The Meshwork of objects: Reading, Mapping, Curating’.

In our introduction in week 1 we discussed whether a human is the sole author of an artwork or if the making of something is more of a co-operation of a person and the meshwork they’re involved in, which includes environment, history, culture etc. We also discussed ‘thingliness’ and how objects become ‘things’ when a) they stop working and b) when we make new stuff out of them. This reminded me of Martin Woodward’s lectures last year when we explored how tools and objects hide from view and have a power of themselves because of the way they rupture the order of the meshwork when they stop working or don’t behave as we want them to. Paper for example, might seem stative but we can get a nasty paper cut which shows the material has an agency of its own.

We spoke of Tim Ingold’s powerful theory that everything in the world is in a state of becoming, that objects are only punctuation points in the life of things. The laptop I’m typing this on is made of elements which will continue beyond the timeframe of its use as a laptop as well as beyond our timeframe as humans. This theory is perfectly summed up by the idea of a holistic ‘meshwork’ whereby we are accountable for everything we put out into the world because of a kind of ‘butterfly’ effect. It’s crucial in thinking about environmental issues too. As a ceramic student it is particularly interesting because I put the clay through irreversible chemical changes in the kiln. The ephemeral nature of the things I make can be illustrated by the way the clay I sculpt or throw with can be slaked down, reclaimed and re-formed into a new object.

Throwing in porcelain

20171010_154544 (600x800)
Nick’s slab built box with my thrown form inside
20171017_144835 (600x800)
Distorting the inside of vessels

I’m throwing in porcelain for the first time. It’s getting easier with practice. At first I found it difficult to knead when it came from the bag but it softens up as you work it. Centering on the wheel is a challenge as it likes to come off, but perhaps this is also because I’m throwing with minimal water. Porcelain is a thirsty clay but using too much water will make it difficult to control so I’ve resorted to throwing with slip instead. I love the tones of light and dark created through these distorted inside forms but how well the light plays on them depends lots on the environment where they’re displayed.

Nick is going to create a plaster mould which we can sit these in and pour porcelain casting slip into to sit them in flat slabs. I found it more difficult to get expressive throwing rings in porcelain so had to use a stick to push them out. Unlike the stoneware bulging and rippling the porcelain wants to hold its form or just collapse completely, there is no middle ground.

20171017_214139 (800x604)
Collaborative drawing

Above are the results of our discussion with ideas for constructing a kind of porcelain igloo or box which you could go inside (or at least put your head inside). We talked about how sound might be distorted as it moves through the twisted vessel forms and how we could use boxed like the one above as bricks to construct a wall you look through. We recorded the discussions so I hope to upload those here soon.

Squares with Two Circles

Arising from our first theory/practice session last Tuesday I’ve identified the artist Barbara Hepworth as a key reference to my project, in particular a bronze work of hers called ‘Squares with two circles’ which I saw a couple of years ago at the Kroller Muller sculpture park in Holland.

squares-with-two-circles-barbara-hepworth-45321-copyright-kroller-muller-museum (450x600)
Image: https://krollermuller.nl/en/barbara-hepworth-squares-with-two-circles

I remember I was drawn to this sculpture enough that I sketched it – the simple geometric forms at a slightly jaunty angle and its pleasing sense of balance gave it a kind of purity of form. The fact the lines aren’t parallel gives it an organic quality that helps it fit in with the natural environment. On each side only one of the circles funnels out which gives the two circles different qualities of depth and the way the patina on the surface is lighter in the upper half makes it appear to be dissolving into the sky at one end and firmly grounded on the other. The original form was made in 1963 although copies were made later which explains why there is also one in the Yorkshire sculpture park.

I’m interested in Hepworth’s forms in regard to my current project because of the way they act as framing devices for their environment, the holes referencing windows. Her emphasis is on form and texture rather than colour. I’m interested in the ways the forms I make create different tones of dark and light by the shadows they cast, so how colour is created by the artist in collaboration with the environment.

In the sculpture park the work is displayed outside the Rietveld Pavilion, a building in which you are at once outside and inside. This is an interesting space because of the way it blurs boundaries, the architecture more a huge sculpture you can walk through really. Many more of Hepworth’s artworks are displayed here which is appropriate since her work explores inside forms with carefully constructed positive and negative space.

I found information about this work on the Tate website and it discusses the holes in the form: ‘The integration with the landscape – one of Hepworth’s abiding concerns – is made actual by these openings, through what she termed the viewer’s ‘sense of participating in the form’ (Bowness 1971, p.12).’
I want to explore this idea that the audience can ‘take part’ in the form. It’s almost as if the interaction between you and the artwork becomes a performance, because you are not just seeing the artwork but using it as a device to look through, to perceive the world differently through, like a telescope or pair of glasses.
Placement therefore becomes important because what the sculpture ‘reveals’ through the frame will depend on where you stand in relation to it. It was important to Hepworth that the sculptures were displayed in the landscape as she explains: ‘I always imagine the sort of setting I would like to see them in, because I firmly believe that sculpture and forms generally grow in magnitude out in the open with space and distance and hills’ (Warren Forma, 5 British Sculptors (Work and Talk), New York, 1964, p.15)
I believe she may be speaking about the powerful way the changing of natural light and weathering of the material (through the day and seasons) can bring a sculpture to life in a way placing it in a room in an art gallery can’t.

Hepworth quotes from: http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/hepworth-squares-with-two-circles-t00702