Dyfal donc a dyr y garreg

Before coming to CSAD I had no knowledge of how glazes, slips and different clays were made. I’d never packed a kiln in my life and I’d have hazarded a guess that feldspar was a type of supermarket. At the end of my first term, I can proudly say that I feel confident mixing my own glazes from recipes and I’ve had experience of packing a kiln correctly and learning how to put on a firing. I’ve made my own throwing tools in the woodwork and metal workshops but as well as new methods of making I’ve learnt new methods of thinking and developing ideas.

I really enjoyed the ‘local clay’ project- sourcing clay from our local area then subjecting it to a series of scientific tests to learn about its porosity, limestone presence and firing temperature. Going right to the source of the material we work with and learning about how its formed was enlightening.

When I started the course I had very little experience of throwing. The few times I managed to get past the tricky stage of centring the lump of clay, I made a handful of ugly  ash trays, each one weighing about as much as a small elephant. On the Foundation course my practice had centred around hand building – coil building mainly, a little slab building and press moulding too. Sculpture excited me but throwing was just…well…pots. It never occurred to me to try joining together thrown forms in a sculptural way. After watching Walter Keeler’s demonstration at Made by Hand and seeing the work of artists like Gordon Baldwin and Lisa Krigel, this is something I want to try. I’ve developed a new appreciation for the humble vessel form now that I realise the happiness that can be found in throwing something as simple as a bowl!

Now that it’s over halfway through the Christmas holidays I’m itching to get back to the wheel. Throwing has won me over. As I see it, it’s a form of practising mindfulness but with the added bonus of having created something beautiful and maybe even functional at the end of it. To look back at what I started with, I feel I’ve definitely improved (maybe not a great deal but as the welsh saying goes ‘Dyfal donc a dyr y garreg’ (tapping persistently breaks the stone). I can now, with varying degrees of success, do things I never imagined trying a few months ago such as throwing off the hump and making series of bottle forms.

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Wobbly throwing attempts at the start of term
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Biscuit fired – trying out new forms

Slipcasting on the other hand, was something I’d never in my life done before. The process is sometimes frustratingly time consuming as opposed to throwing which feels very immediate. I like the way slipcasting has the ability to capture minute details and it’s got me looking closer at everyday objects around my home to find out how they were made. However at the moment I’m not keen on the neat, mass-produced look of the finished outcome. I prefer how the objects look with the jagged seams of spilled slip still attached. This way they remind me of ancient artefacts freshly dug out from the earth. I feel slipcasting is the technique in ceramics which most embodies hylomorphism – there’s a lot of control imposed upon the clay and I feel it loses some of it’s ‘life’ and movement. This is why I like throwing but hate turning. If I over-turn a vessel it ends up looking strained and contrived. I want what I make to be a dialogue between myself and the material but not a one way conversation.

This first term I’ve had a wealth of opportunities to develop skills from volunteering as a pottery showdown assistant at Cardiff City Hall’s ‘Made by Hand’ craft fair to supporting throwing lessons with groups of students from the art Foundation course. Helping others to throw was itself a method of learning because I was challenged to reflect on my own technique and think about the series of movements involved.

Constellation has been valuable in challenging my long-held assumptions about the role of the mind and body in making. I’ve been introduced to new ideas about how we view the world and the role of our senses but more importantly I’ve been encouraged to question everything  – what kind of environment do I prefer to work in? Why did I draw that line the way I did? Why does it matter?

Now that I’ve been introduced to various working techniques, the plan for next term is to see how processes work together – I’d like to try plaster casting sprig moulds to attach decoration to thrown forms, altering and hand building onto thrown forms as well as seeing if I can throw the clay from my local area. If the consistency isn’t right I want to know what I can add to the clay to change its properties. Also next term I’m making an effort to combat my obsessive compulsive disorderliness to minimise clay dust in my work area.

 

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