Loud colours and sharp lemons

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Above: drawn from touch  Below: drawn from sight

The first drawing is of an object (a metal fastener) perceived by touch alone. The ones below were drawn while looking at that object afterwards.
Drawing the object from touch, there was no pressure to create a ‘good’ drawing. I knew that even my best efforts would probably result in inaccuracies and because of this the drawing appears looser and more carefree than the other two. I took the approach of a continuous line drawing, since this technique felt more appropriate to translate my perception of the object through touch. Holding the fastener in my hand, my finger worked to feel around it in a continuous line motion. In contrast, in the second drawings the lines are much more confident and precise but lack expression and spontaneity.
I find it interesting how my mind imposed memories on the object as I felt it. It made me think of a specific carabiner I thought I’d seen my dad use, so I drew the criss-crossed texture that one had on its grip instead of feeling carefully and discovering the texture was instead vertical lines. I imagined the metal to be dark purple in colour, probably thinking back to the smooth metal texture of a purple camera I owned years ago. I had a much more personal experience of the object by just feeling it.
In the first drawing the metal is a lot thicker than perceived by sight. Might this have something to do with the perception of temperature? The metal felt cold to touch, could this have led me to feel it occupied a larger space, that there was more of it?
The drawing from touch is also noticeably larger, maybe because I felt the need to leave room to accommodate future details on the object I might perceive later on. I felt this approach focused my attention on the process of drawing in contrast to when I drew the fastener while looking at it. This instead focused my attention on the outcome of the activity rather than the activity itself.

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